Resurrections and frauds of Pedro Sanchez

Corbyn, Hamon or the resurrection of Pedro Sanchez express, in different contexts, similar situations from the point of view of the causes and nature of the crisis of their respective parties but represent very different political projects: a genuine and honest reformism in the case of Corbyn, and a very limited regeneration in the case of Hamon and, even more so, in that of Sánchez

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The dilemma of Europe: a fundamental debate on sovereignty for the New Spanish Left

Globalization is stuck. Since 2008, as indicated by Chief Economics Commentator of Financial Times, Martin Wolf, we are seeing a real stagnation of international trade. The benefits greater trade integration through reductions in tariffs are becoming smaller and smaller -a third of 1% of GDP over 10 years for the whole world. Furthermore, in absence of institutions that can distribute the increased output of this integration -at European and global scale- there is no plausible globalist solution to the current crisis in a reasonable timing.

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Europe: No “LEXIT” without “Another Europe Possible” - based on struggles in/outside/against the EU

Since the Greek trauma – both the neo-colonial diktat from the Euro-group and agreement by Tsipras to submit despite the popular OXI – the European radical left has debated “Plans B” without any strategic or tactical consensus. The referendum in the United Kingdom (UK) is the bitter illustration of this, without the anti-racist left opposed to the EU having the conditions of expression of a credible alternative to the dominant national, European and international institutions and policies. With less of a media profile than Brexit, the referendum on 6 April, 2016 in the Netherlands, rejecting the agreement of association between the Ukraine and the EU shamefully illustrates the same booby trapped “choices” for the internationalist left.

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Does France have a future in the euro area?

This talk tries to give answers to two important questions in the current context: to what extent is the euro an economic and political cost for France? And is an exit or dismantling of the euro possible, or would it rather be a catastrophe?

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The time of dislocation

Now is the time of dislocation. Amid economic disaster, bureaucratic arrogance and disregard for social issues, the appeal of the European project has declined steadily in recent years. The accumulated centrifugal forces are now taking over. The United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (EU) is the first step towards a dismemberment process of the Union that seems ever more likely -if not inevitable.

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The project of the United States of Europe in the context of the eurozone crisis

The main political meaning of the Maastricht Treaty (1991-92), which prolongs and goes beyond the Single European Act (1985) is that the German, French and English imperialists bourgeoisies agreed to make a (limited) transfer of national sovereignty to start embryonic structures to create a supranational European state. The introduction of the single currency put the question of state power in the center of the EU: the currency is a key attribute of any state apparatus, so that the euro entailed a waiver of national sovereignty and its transference to supranational institutions (mainly the European Central Bank). From that moment the single currency inevitably would have a decisive influence in the national - state politics of the government, so its introduction supposed the qualitative jump towards a truly central supranational state. However, considering the antagonisms between different national bourgeoisies, accentuated in the context of the present crisis, the European ruling classes have not managed to consolidate completely the project through a fiscal and political union that guarantees the culmination of the European supranational state.

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Senseless killings: Nice on the 14th of July

July 14th is French Independence day or the day of the Bastille. France celebrates on this day that the French people liberated themselves from an oppressive and autocratic regime and took their first towards the establishment of a republic. Liberty, equality and fraternity were the battle cries of the revolution.  The spirit of the Enlightenment became a tangible reality for the first time in history. In fact, Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité were only officially declared the main goals of policy by the so-called Second Republic in 1848, but July 14 stands out as the main symbol.

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Alone Now: From Hope to Brexit Despair

The summer of 2015 brought a spectacularly bright ray of progressive hope to the United Kingdom: the increasingly obvious likelihood that a socialist would soon lead the near-moribund Labour Party. After almost 20 years of Thatcher-lite neoliberal policies, the grassroots membership voted overwhelmingly for Jeremy Corbyn to take leadership of the Labour Party. The progressive victory proved short-lived. Less than year later, the far Right would achieve its greatest victory in British electoral history, winning the IN/OUT referendum on the European Union through a campaign of flagrant xenophobia and racism.

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The Brexit and a black Friday – in Germany

June 24, 2016 will go down in history as the Black Friday of European development. But as so often happen in such cases, the historiography remains superficial. If we want to understand what is really going on, we need to delve much deeper into the events. This Friday is not ‘black’ because a majority of the British electorate chose to leave the EU. It is the reaction of the policy-makers and the media on the continent, and especially in Germany, that made the day into a something very dark.

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The case for Brexit: Democracy and Sovereignty in the EU?

We should never forget some important questions. Firstly, at the beginning the European Union (EU) was relatively successful in economic terms but, more recently it has done pretty badly. Over the last two decades, the economic performance of the EU is poor in comparison with that of almost all industrialised countries (USA, Canada, Australia or even the UK). Different reasons have been pointed out: the EU policy has tended towards excessive regulation and interference which have produced poor and inefficient spending of funds and allocation of resources; the objective of ever closer union has absorbed the time and attention of Europe's elites, when they should have been occupied trying to address the factors that make for real economic growth; the trends of demographics in the EU with an important increase, in absolute and relative terms, of the aging population; the implementation of the euro and the corresponding fixed exchange rates of the currency.

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Brexit: Much ado about nothing?

‘Much ado about nothing,’ as Shakespeare wrote, may perhaps be slightly exaggerated in the Brexit case, but ‘Alot ado about little’ would be absolutely appropriate. Even the play of words between Brexit and Grexit is misleading. A Grexit means that Greece would leave the euro zone. It would issue its own currency, depreciate it in order to stimulate its exports and it would probably encourage other countries to follow its example. The United Kingdom, on the other hand, is not even a part of the euro zone. If the Brexit camp wins in two weeks from now, the British will opt out of some European treaties. This is being portrayed as almost a matter of life of death these days. It is not.

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Why Varoufakis’ DiEM2025 is fighting the wrong fight

This text deals with strategy, but strategy cannot be seen separate from people and their histories and actions. SYRIZA has always been an uneasy conglomerate of groups of many political persuasions, but ever since it came to power in January 2015, until its capitulation seven months later, two main fractions fought a fierce fight. On one side, there was the heterogeneous left, which wanted to make good on the electoral promise (the Thessaloniki program): there was going to be no austerity any longer, Greece would negotiate a debt write off and if the Troika pushed the country to the brink, the group advocated leaving the euro zone. The leadership, on the other side, also wanted to end austerity. But under no condition was it willing to exit the euro zone.

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The case for Germany leaving the euro. #Gexit

The case for or against a British exit from the EU – #Brexit – is headline news. For the moment the earlier quarrel about a possible Greek exit from the Eurozone – #Grexit – seems to have taken the back seat – with one or two exceptions such as Christian Lindner, leader of Germany’s liberal FDP. Most EU proponents are deeply concerned about these prospects and the repercussions either might have on European unity. Yet, while highly important, neither of them should distract Europe from zooming in on the real issue: the dominant and altogether destructive role of Germany in European affairs today. There can be no doubt that the German “stability-oriented” approach to European unity has failed dismally. It is high time for Europe to contemplate the option of a German exit from the Eurozone – #Gexit – since this might be the least damaging scenario for Europe to emerge from its euro trap and start afresh.

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No bread without yeast

I do not think we need to explain that the European Union is an imperialist consortium; that it was formed under the best auspices of the US and NATO as anti-Sovietprostheses; and even to indicate that the Union advance corresponded to a historic defeat of the working class and social struggles cycle started in the '60s. Nor have to remember that the European Union focuses on the single currency is not just an economic community based on neo-liberal paradigms, but a real political regime.

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